List of 70 news stories.

  • Finding Strengths and Unlocking Potential

    written by: Eagle Hill School
    Keyhole
    What does it mean to find your strength? How can someone “unlock” potential? This article will discuss some practical ways students who learn differently can tap into their potential.
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  • Relational Learning and the Opportunities That Exist at Boarding School

    written by: Eagle Hill School


    Relational learning is just what it sounds like—the ability for groups of people to learn from—and in relation to—one another. Boarding schools offer a unique opportunity for educators, faculty and students to learn from one another in ways that are atypical to the mainstream classroom. 
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  • What Does Attending an LD School Really Mean?

    written by: Max Schaefer EHS '10
    
    Students and parents on the brink of embarking on a new chapter in their child’s education often wonder what it means to attend a school for learning disabilities. Hint—it's different for everyone!
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  • Preventing Summer Academic Regression

    written by: Dana Harbert

    Summer provides a great time for students to relax and have fun, but the summer season can be a long one for students and their parents both at home and in terms of the impact on academics. A five-week academic program combined with a classic summer camp experience can be just what is needed to stave off boredom and help prevent students’ skills from regressing, thus avoiding a difficult return to school in September. Many parents make the decision to have their children attend an academic and fun-filled summer camp where they will have fun, make new friends, and, at the same time, learn. When students then go back to school in September, they will hit the ground running. 

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  • Why Boarding School?

    written by: Helen Waldron, M.Ed.

    “Why would anyone send their kids to boarding school?” Since 1989, when I signed on as a boarding school teacher I have been answering this question. As a teen who yearned to live outside the confines of my home town, I vicariously lived through my friends who attended boarding school. They wrote letters telling me about classmates from places like Oslo, Norway and Bangkok, Thailand. They rowed in regattas, played squash, took Mandarin class and joined debate club. They cheered on friends at water polo matches, studied abroad, went dog sledding, joined animation club, directed and produced an original play and the list goes on. Not surprisingly, I chose a boarding school career.
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  • How Can I Help My Teen Sleep?

    written by: Eagle Hill School

    Sleep is tough to come by, especially for students who are spending time cramming for exams, readying themselves for quizzes, or finishing term papers. Unfortunately, when we look at our schedules, sleep is often the first thing we cut out. As this article will discuss, that is a mistake, and the short-term gains that might be had in sleeping less are generally outweighed by the long-term effects of sleep deprivation.
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  • School’s Out! Set Your Child Up for a Successful Summer

    written by: Eagle Hill School

    Although the school year is over, that doesn’t mean learning needs to or should stop. Keeping your child engaged over the summer and maintaining the momentum and progress made during the school year is one of the most crucial things you can do as a parent of a child with a learning disability.
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  • Tips for College Success for Students with Learning Differences

    written by: Jed Geary

    There are three universal tips for college success that are not limited to students with learning disabilities and that I would give all 18-year-olds heading off to college and possibly leaving home for the first time.
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    1. How Will an IB Diploma Help My Child?

      written by: Jason Przypek

      The International Baccalaureate is a nonprofit educational foundation offering prestigious, internationally minded educational programs. Its Diploma Programme is recognized and respected by leading universities around the world.
       
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    2. How Habits Become Habits

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      We hear a lot about habits—starting good ones, breaking bad ones—but how are habits formed? What makes a person predisposed to certain habits? Most importantly, how can students focus on the process of how habits become habits to ensure they create good ones?
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    3. Is Boarding School Right for My Child?

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      It's a difficult decision for many parents to send their children to boarding school. This decision can be even more daunting when your child has been identified with a learning disability and you have spent years as his or her most consistent and outspoken advocate. Nonetheless, the questions are there. Is it the best thing for the student? Who will make sure the student is getting the help they need? Will they/we be happy with this decision? Is it worth the financial investment? These are very real considerations for families, and by sharing the benefits of boarding school, we hope to dispel some of the fear and apprehension of this decision, and see it as a tangible and hope-filled opportunity.   
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    4. Beyond the Beanbag: Residence Life Programming and Why It Matters

      written by: Natalie Mays

      As the 3:11 bell rings and the last class is dismissed for the day, most students look forward to an activity-filled afternoon with friends, sports, and the moments that will become lifetime memories. What they may not realize, however, is that when the school day ends, programming has been carefully crafted to provide for their continued learning for the remainder of the day.
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    5. What Is a “Disorder of Written Expression” and How Do I Help My Child?

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Disorder of written expression, often conflated with “dysgraphia” (which we will cover later), is a phrase used to describe students who have difficulty with the conceptual aspects of writing; for example, issues that extend beyond handwriting or sentence formulation.

      To elaborate, many researchers think of a disorder of written expression as a combination of poor handwriting, below-average punctuation and grammar, jumbled sentence composition, and general difficulty organizing thoughts into coherent messages when writing.
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    6. IEP—How to Get It Done

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Developing an individualized education program (IEP) for your child can be an extremely overwhelming task. There are many different methods, models, and recommendations suggesting the best way to go about it.

      The goal of this article is not to proffer up yet another new model, but to synthesize some of the best recommendations into a clear and coherent step-by-step plan.
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    7. Levels of Support Available in College for Students with Learning Disabilities

      written by: Jed Geary

      Every college is unique. This is why you will hear college counselors, this one included, talk about the importance of finding the right fit. Part of their uniqueness includes how they offer academic support. Some colleges will offer accommodations for classroom/lecture hall environments and testing situations while others will offer a varying amount of tutoring. The tutoring may be offered by peers who scored well in last year's class or had up to 14 hours of tutor training while other schools may offer professional tutors who have master's degrees. Some colleges have tutoring that is centralized within a learning center and others have tutoring run through the academic departments.
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    8. Tips for Parents with College Bound Kids

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      College-Bound Child? Here’s How to Prepare.

      Congratulations - your student is headed to college! This exciting transition may also bring with it some concerns or worries about arming your child with the tools to succeed in a new and challenging environment. Here are some ways you can help your child prepare for success in the next step of his or her education:
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    9. College Admission Tips for Students with Learning Disabilities

      written by: Jed Geary

      Many of these tips can be applied to all students applying to college; however, there are a few tips that are specific to students diagnosed with a specific learning disability.
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    10. How to Get Your Child More Engaged with Learning

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      It has long been a fact of life that some people are naturally curious in the classroom, are voracious readers, and possess inquisitive, restless minds. There are equally capable and bright people who don’t have the same innate love of learning, but who must go through the motions nonetheless.

      This article will cover a few brief ways that parents can help encourage their children to engage more not only with the material they are learning but the process itself.
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    11. Fundamentals of a STEM Education

      written by: Eagle Hill School
      More and more teachers, parents and students are hearing the phrase “STEM education,” but what is it really? Why does it matter? And how does it factor into a child’s education? This blog post will explore the fundamentals of STEM education and its place in education.
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    12. Are Video Games Addicting?

      written by: James Thibeault

      I’m not ashamed to admit that I play video games often. I probably average an hour or two each night—playing as adventurous heroes like Batman, who deliver righteous roundhouses to thugs and thieves. I would like to think that despite the countless hours that I have put into my video games, I am still a productive member of society who has other hobbies as well. On the other hand, I have seen close friends of mine play video games nonstop—as if it was a full-time job. They shut themselves out from the world and immerse themselves into another one for days on end.
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    13. Don’t Stress It—How Too Much Stress Can Affect Learning

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Stress is, unfortunately, a part of everyday life—we all experience it. Whether at our jobs, during our commute, or trying to plan a big trip, stress is a natural element in our lives. It’s no different for children in school, and this is particularly true for children who struggle with learning disabilities.
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    14. Emoji Algebra Is More Intuitive than Standard Algebra

      written by: Dr. Tony McCaffrey

      Students of mine who have great difficulty with algebra have little problem solving the puzzle below, which uses pictures of food instead of standard variables (i.e., x, y, and z). (The solution is at the end of this blog.) Further, two of my current summer students are a 3rd grader and a 4th grader and they can also solve the food puzzle below, even though they are at least two years away from studying algebraic equations in school.
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    15. Exercise and Your LD Student

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      It is commonly understood that exercise can benefit us all. From cardiac to cognitive benefits, it is almost universally accepted that “working out” is good for us. This same logic applies to students and individuals who struggle with learning disabilities ranging from common disabilities to more involved learning profiles.
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    16. Our Innovative Students Are What the World Needs

      written by: Dr. Tony McCaffrey
      <The desire to hire people who look at problems differently is growing. The Harvard Business Review published a 2017 article, Neurodiversity as a Competitive Advantage , which discussed how a growing number of companies are now changing their hiring practices. These businesses were finding that people with learning differences had some incredible skills that the companies badly needed but very few people with learning differences were actually making it through the interview process. As part of their changes, these companies were also providing assistance to these new hires to help them with some of their weaker skills.
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    17. The Benefits of Summer Camp for Students with Learning Disabilities

      written by: Erin Wynne

      In Malcolm Gladwell’s book, 
      Outliers, Gladwell makes the case with statistical evidence that the single greatest factor in a child’s academic achievement is not race, socioeconomic status, or even IQ scores…but rather the level to which students have a structured academic experience during the summer. Quite simply, students who have regular academic work over the summer—never mind attending a summer program like that offered at Eagle Hill School—achieve academically at a rate that far exceeds their peers. Give your child the opportunity to experience a summer program that balances academic work with a fun camp experience, and you will have truly optimized your child’s academic, physical, and social development, leading to profound and lasting positive effects.
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    18. Managing Downtime for Teens at Boarding School

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      This article will discuss what schools (and students) are doing to proactively manage downtime on campus during the year, a well-known catalyst for problem behaviors, particularly in students with learning disabilities.

      In our last blog post on downtime, “Beyond the Beanbag: Residence Life Programming and Why It Matters,” we learned how schools are intentionally creating and cultivating an environment where after-school time is structured to provide growth opportunities for LD students.
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    19. Boarding School—Making Friends and Meeting People

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      A lot of parents of first-time boarders find themselves asking, “How do I help my child make friends at boarding school?” This is a more common concern than many think. Going away for school can be scary. There are many unknowns: Who will I be friends with? How will I cope with all the work? Where am I going to sit at lunch?
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    20. Why “Grit” Sometimes Doesn’t Cut It

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      You've probably heard the term grit; thrown around a lot recently in relation to teaching and raising successful students. Grit is the new buzzword, synonymous with perseverance, passion, happiness, and success. But, it might not cut it for students with learning disabilities.

      The grit movement suggests that students can be taught to control their impulses, push themselves in the face of adversity, and ultimately overcome setbacks. Although this rigid approach might work for some students, those with learning disabilities should be encouraged to approach problems more organically, with an eye towards the systems and methods that work best for them as individual learners.
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    21. Harnessing ADHD—The Power of ADHD in the Classroom

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      We often think of students who have ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) as students who have a learning disability. While it is true that these children may learn differently than others, viewing this difference as a dis-ability is a mistake.

      Instead of categorizing ADHD as an impairment, we should consider that perhaps these children have extraordinary powers that allow them to think in new and imaginative ways.
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    22. Back to School—Everything Your Child Needs for a Well-Stocked Dorm Room

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      It’s that time of the year again—purchasing school supplies, items for dorm rooms, and clothes, and stockpiling food for the first day on campus. While all of this can be overwhelming at first, especially for parents of first-time boarders, a detailed list will be your best friend in keeping organized and making sure that nothing is missed.
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    23. Learning to Live with Dyslexia

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Dyslexia is the most notorious of all the learning disabilitiesperhaps because of how frustrating it can be to live with it. That isn’t to say that other learning disabilities, such as ADD, aren’t equally challenging, but dyslexia presents a unique set of challenges.

      This article will talk not only about how dyslexia can pose difficulties on a day-to-day basis, but how to cope with them and learn to live more fully despite what may seem like an impossible disability.
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    24. Tips for Students with Executive Functioning Disorders

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      What is an executive functioning disorder? We hear and use this term a lot in the learning (dis)abled community, but because it’s such a broad topic, there is often confusion about what executive functioning disorders are and what the issues look like. This article will provide both an overview of the problems many students face, and some tips that can help make living with these challenges easier.
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    25. Tips for Getting Students to Put Themselves “Out There”

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      “Putting yourself out there” isn’t easy, even as an adult. The challenge is even more difficult in adolescence when everything seems more amplified and the stakes much higher.

      You can help your children learn how to make the process of getting to know new people and experience new things not so scary—keep reading to learn more.
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    26. Things I Wish Parents of LD Students

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Parents know their children best; however, the diagnosis of a learning disorder can make some feel like they might not have a total grasp on who their child is, or what makes them tick. Although having a child with a learning disability can be challenging, keeping the following things in mind will be helpful not only to parents, but their children as well.
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    27. “Are Schools Smart Enough to Know How Smart Students Are?”

      written by: Dr. Tony McCaffrey
      In “Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?,” Frans de Waal discusses how the study of animal cognition is recently breaking free of lumping diverse animals into one category and judging them on one dimension of intelligence. Before this recent shift, researchers would often give the same puzzles to diverse species without any accommodations. For example, chimps easily use long sticks to reach up for elevated food, but elephants do not. Are chimps therefore smarter than elephants? Not if you notice that an elephant does not pick up sticks with the tip of its trunk because the stick would block its nasal passage. Replace the stick with a sturdy box and the elephant will kick the box into position so it can stand on it to retrieve the food.
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    28. My Child Was Diagnosed with a Learning Disability—Now What?

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      No parent is thrilled to hear that their child has a learning disability. At first blush this means a few things: my child will struggle more than others…my child will always be behind…my child is in for a difficult life.
      While these initial “gut reactions” aren’t true, they are also not unfounded—in many ways life is different for people, especially children and adolescents, with learning disabilities. However, this doesn’t mean that life is worse.
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    29. How to Make Math Fun for Students Who Struggle with Learning Disabilities

      written by: Dr. Tony McCaffrey

      Imagine algebra being taught inside a game where spies try to decode enemy secrets and hack into enemy computer systems. Many students have fun imagining engaging in such tasks and students who struggle with learning disabilities are no different. There are many fictional spy movies and historically based movies such as The Imitation Game where math is used to save lives and win wars. This motif can turn learning dry algebra skills into engaging in “life-and-death situations.”
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    30. Mobile Algebra

      written by: Dr. Tony McCaffrey

      In a previous blog about Emoji Algebra, I presented the idea of using pictures (i.e., emojis) for variables. I will now add to that idea by using the physical structure of a mobile to represent the balance (i.e., equality) that must take place between the two sides of an equation.
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    31. Tips for Getting “Nonwriters” to Write

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      What is a “nonwriter?” When we use the term, we typically mean a student who can write, but who detests it and avoids it at all costs. Why are some students such big fans of writing while others aren’t, and how can we encourage “nonwriters” to write? We’ll cover that below.
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    32. Tips to Improve Reading Skills in Students with Dyslexia

      written by: Nancy Martin

      Convincing Students to Read More through Independent Reading
      As humans, we tend to enjoy activities that come naturally or easily. So how do we encourage students with dyslexia to read? Research has shown the best way to improve reading is simply to read. Not complete worksheets, not write book summaries, not answer comprehension questions—simply spend time immersed in a book we’re enjoying to the point we can’t put it down. Unfortunately, research has shown that in many schools the students with the lowest reading skills are given the least amount of time to read (Allington 2006).
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    33. Why Learning Shouldn’t Stop When Summer Starts

      written by: Eagle Hill School
      For students with learning disabilities, making progress in the classroom is typically challenging. Further, keeping that momentum up over the weeks and semesters of the school year can seem like an almost impossible task. Imagine, then, how difficult it must be for a child who struggles with a learning difference to retain during the summer all the information he or she has learned throughout the year.
       
      This article will discuss ways that students with learning differences can keep learning when school is over, without ruining summer (because everyone needs a break).
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    34. New Year, New You—A Checklist for Success

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Every year we set resolutions for the new year. It’s not uncommon to see hordes of people hitting the gym, getting into the office early, or taking on other new challenges. Unfortunately, most of these bursts of action are short-lived, and this is mostly because people don’t have a solid plan in place to keep them on track.
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    35. Classroom Anxiety—Learning to Raise Your Hand

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Classroom anxiety is real. Sometimes it’s a result of a learning disability, sometimes it is the impediment to learning itself—no matter the case, it is a major issue for many students in today’s classrooms.

      Class sometimes isn’t fun for anyone; it’s the job of institutions and educators across the country to make it an intriguing, informative, and immersive experience. Sometimes, however, a student’s hesitation to enter the classroom stems from a more serious problem: anxiety.
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    36. How Boarding School Prepared Me for College

      written by: Max Schaefer '10

      When I first headed off for boarding school, I had the distinct feeling that I was being “shipped away.” I had read Roald Dahl’s books that detailed his many stories of strict parochial boarding schools, heard accounts from friends about these being places where “the bad kids went,” and generally understood it to be a punishment of some sort.
       
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    37. How to Help Boarding School Students with Learning Disabilities Transition from Middle School to High School

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      The transition from middle school to high school is never an easy one, especially if that high school is a boarding school. Even more, transitioning to a school for students with learning disabilities can sometimes seem more challenging because of the unknown.
       
      Although making the jump is never easy, the transition doesn’t have to be something to dread. This article will discuss a few key ways that new high school students, particularly boarding students, can make the adjustment easier.
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    38. Mindfulness and Learning Differences

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      As education continues to evolve, becoming ever more competitive and fast-paced, our framework as educators must evolve along with it. Equally as important as ensuring solid educational foundations is the challenge of building healthy, lasting habits.
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    39. Mindfulness Meditation as a Way to Focus One’s Mind

      written by: Chiu "Andy" Hwang

      Near a frontier village, there lived a father and a son. One of the father’s horses accidentally went missing, and all the villagers consoled him. He replied, “I am not sure but that this could be a good thing.” After several months, the horse came back, along with the finest horse he had ever seen; all the villagers congratulated him. The father said, “Well, this could actually be bad for me.” Of his father’s many horses, the son liked riding the beautiful horse that came to them best. But he fell off this horse, and broke his leg. When the villagers consoled him, the father said, “This looks very bad, but I think it could be a fortunate event.” One year later, barbarians invaded the frontier, and all able-bodied men took up arms and went to war. Of the men from this frontier village, nine out of ten were killed. Owing to his broken leg, the son did not have to go to war, and survived.
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    40. Building a Language: Students with Dyslexia and ADHD Can Successfully Learn Foreign Language through TPRS

      written by: Miriam Pallant

      The woodworking course at our school is without a doubt a favorite. The sense of pride that students feel as we all admire and utilize their finished pieces is palpable. While I am certain that each course begins with explanations of how to operate the machinery safely and effectively, it is clear that students dedicate the majority of their class time to measuring, building, and constructing.
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    41. Time Management Tips for High School Students

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      High school can be overwhelming. There are new and challenging classes, more extracurricular commitments, lots of social obligations, and of course loads of homework. For new high school students, and even those well on their way to graduation, keeping track of everything can be tough.

      While a packed schedule can wear on anyone, there are some simple, easily implemented time management “hacks” that your child can utilize this school year to help manage their workload.
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    42. Create Like a Mathematician?!

      written by: Dr. Tony McCaffrey

      Most students do not think of mathematicians as being creative. Math was created long ago, so their story goes. Geometry was created 2,300 years ago; algebra 1,200 years ago; and calculus 350 years ago. No math has been created since long ago, they speculate.
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    43. Why Choose a School with an IB Program?

      written by: Jason Przypek

      If you’re a parent looking for the right fit in an independent school, then you might want to give an extra look at any school with an IB program. I say this not only to parents with ambitious straight A students, but to parents in general looking for a quality learning community.
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    44. Five Questions to Ask Your Educational Consultant If Your Child Has a Learning Disability

      written by: Dana Harbert

      Searching for the right school for your child can be a daunting task, and many families smartly hire an educational consultant to help guide them through the process. There are educational consultants to work with students with all types of needs, from those who are looking for the appropriate college to others who are in need of a therapeutic placement. Looking for a school to work with a student with a learning difference is all part of an educational consultant’s job. With that in mind, I thought it would be helpful to provide questions that parents might ask their educational consultant prior to searching for schools.
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    45. The Struggle is Real

      written by: Elise Johnson

      I often hear students express the sentiment of “the struggle is real.” Some even wear it on their sweatshirts or hashtag it on social media platforms. Rounding corners and coming face-to-face with adolescent changes and sensitivities, varying expectations in the classroom (and at home), complex social situations involving issues of diversity and contradictions to society’s civic responsibilities can leave students feeling overwhelmed. 
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    46. How Students Can Become Leaders Inside and Outside the Classroom

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Leadership is a popular subject. We read about it through the lens of business and commerce, sports, medicine, and lately most prominently in politics. But what makes a leader? When we consider this question in the context of education, we sometimes tend to think about our educators and administration, but some of the biggest leaders are the students in the classroom. If we want to instill future leadership, the way to do that is through our students and children.
       
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    47. Some Thoughts on Building Progressive Alliances Across Our Differences

      written by: Michael W. Apple

      This is a very difficult time in education in many nations. Neoliberal and conservative policies have had major effects on schools, on communities, on students, on administrators, on teachers, and on all school staff. As I point out in a number of recent books, under the influence of those with increasing power in education and in all too much of society what is public is supposedly bad and what is private is supposedly good. Budget cuts have been pushed forward; jobs have been cut; attacks on educators at all levels and on their autonomy and their organizations and unions gain more visibility; corporate models of competition, accountability, and measurement have been imposed; continual insecurity has become the norm.
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    48. Math Games Help Students Who Struggle with Dyscalculia

      written by: Dr. Tony McCaffrey

      Inspired by the game Settlers of Catan, I constructed a game-world that requires using math as the players manage their crops, livestock, natural resources, and defenses. Thus was born Skellig, in which each player manages an island—or skellig, using an Irish word for rocky island.
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    49. Technology Assistance Tips for Students with Learning Disabilities

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Today’s world offers more technological tools for students than ever before. In harnessing the power of these new tools, students with learning disabilities can capitalize on their unique strengths and abilities and reach their educational goals. This article will discuss helpful technology for your child or student and suggest ways to integrate these tools into your child’s educational approach.
       
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    50. The Importance of Internships for Students with Learning Disabilities

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Getting into college is more difficult and more competitive than ever. The process has become increasingly complicated, stressful, and even emotionally taxing for both students and parents. However, like anything, being prepared and well equipped can greatly help smooth the process.
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    51. Dyslexia: Not a “One Size Fits All”

      written by: Eagle Hill School
      Dyslexia has become the hallmark term for learning disabilities—it’s often mistakenly used to describe any sort of learning issue. Not only is this a false representation of the spectrum of learning disabilities and differences, it also doesn’t do justice to the variety of dyslexia that exists.
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    52. How College Academic Support Differs from High School

      written by: Jed Geary

      It is important to understand that two different laws govern the assistance that students with learning disabilities receive in high school versus college. In high school, students with learning disabilities are covered under the federal law, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). There is no special education at the college level. When students matriculate to college, they are covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). There are significant differences for what this means for students. The link below is an excellent resource outlining the most significant of these:
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    53. This New Year, Commit to Unlearning Disability

      written by: Dr. Matt Kim

      The Learning Diversity blog has now been online for several years. We continue to reach a diverse readership, including secondary school educators, college faculty, parents, nonprofit organizations, and, of course, students. It being January, and being the new editor of Learning Diversity,
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    54. Getting Through—Teaching a Child with a Learning Disability

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Teaching isn't easy; it's a challenge for every educator, administrator, and parent out there. The usual difficulties are only compounded when trying to teach a child with a learning disability, or a learning difference. Learning differences not only require us to think about reframing our approach in the classroom, but also to rethink how parents and school systems play into supporting these children, holistically. When considering the best way to help educate a child with a learning disability, we should consider our schools, teachers, and home environment.
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    55. How to Prepare Your Child for an Interview with an Admission Officer at a Private School

      written by: Dana Harbert

      Every year after Labor Day, the admission office starts to get busy with families interested in having their sons or daughters attend boarding school. Oftentimes we receive calls or e-mails from parents wondering about the admission process, what their child should wear when he or she visits, and what the interview will be like, and we are, of course, happy to help parents with these questions.
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    56. Learning Disabilities and IB

      written by: Jason Przypek

      Many people only vaguely familiar with the IB Diploma Program might describe it as a prestigious and rigorous course of study, well respected but demanding, the kind of thing that makes high school juniors and seniors pull out their prematurely graying hair. What they might not know is that IB is committed to making its programs accessible to the widest range of students. A whole range of accommodations is available to students with learning (dis)abilities. And, most importantly, the program is wonderfully flexible, leaving day-to-day pedagogical decisions and instructional methods to the discretion of the teacher in the classroom.
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    57. Unlocking the Adjacent Possible in the Studio Space: Some Thoughts on Making Spaces for Our Students to Achieve Academic Success

      written by: Dr. Matthew Kim

      Over the last year, I have traveled across the United States touring studio spaces and makerspaces in high schools, colleges and universities, and community literacy centers. The objective in my traveling was to meet students and teachers and community leaders working with a variety of media in preparation to help lead our own school toward designing a new innovative, student-centered learning space
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    58. Examining Life Thoreau-ly

      written by: Jess Geary - Eagle Hill School

      This was by far the best year for apples that I can remember. The apple trees on our campus in central Massachusetts were heavy under the weight of the sweet fruits, and I took advantage of them personally, as a parent, and as a teacher, as often as I could. With my borrowed 10-foot fruit picker, my children and my “Thoreau” students and I collected well over a hundred pounds of apples from September to December. We fulfilled our “apple a day” requirement; read about the historical and literary importance of apples; closely observed and journaled about an apple’s texture, appearance, flavor, smell, and eventual decay; took a tree-core sample; collected and organized fruit from each tree; and enlisted the help of professionals to identify the varieties and age of the trees on our school’s campus. This gastronomical and pomological gluttony had a profound effect on me.
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    59. Home for the Holidays: Understanding Your Child When They Are Home from Boarding School

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      It’s the most wonderful time of the year…the holidays are in full swing, family is gathering for festive fun, cheer is in the air…and your kids are home from boarding school? Now, we know that everyone misses their children when they’re off at school, but the reality is that having them home for a few weeks can be quite the adjustment.
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    60. What It Takes to Be a Successful Teacher at Eagle Hill School and Your School

      written by: Dr. Matthew Kim

      Last weekend, a colleague and I participated in the Southeast Writing Center Association. We visited K-12 teachers and university faculty in Columbus, Georgia, at Columbus State University. He and I were invited as presenters at a featured session to give a talk on Learning Diversity and on how teachers might practice learning diversity in emergent writing studios.
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    61. Making Science Relevant for Diverse Learners

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      From time to time, I find myself in social settings revealing my current vocation as a teacher. As I share that I predominantly teach biology, there are oftentimes one of two reactions. One is a mildly patronizing appreciation for working with young people (it is a noble pursuit, so I’m told). Another is a response when people almost shudder at the notion that I teach a subject that plagued their own schooling experience. Both of these equally amusing interactions cause me to reflect about what it is that I actually do as a science educator (or more optimistically, what I like to think that I do).
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    62. Tips for Transitioning Back to Boarding School

      written by: Eagle Hill School

      Preparing boarding school students for learning is not just about buying back to school supplies. Moving onto campus and adjusting to a new rhythm can be emotionally trying, even for experienced boarders (and their parents). For students to be ready to learn, they need to feel as if they are in a safe space, both physically and emotionally. Our seasoned faculty recognizes that this transition can be stressful for many families and is ready to help.
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    What is Learning Diversity About?

    Learning Diversity is a blog hosted by Eagle Hill School where educators, students, and other members of the LD community regularly contribute posts and critical essays about learning and living in spaces that privilege the inevitability of human diversity.

    The contributors of Learning Diversity come together to engage our readers from a variety of disciplines, including the humanities, social sciences, biological sciences and mathematics, athletics, and residential life. Embracing learning diversity means understanding and respecting our students as whole persons.


    P.O. Box 116
    242 Old Petersham Road
    Hardwick, MA 01037
    Phone: 413.477.6000
    Fax: 413.477.6837

    Eagle Hill School

    An innovative approach to LD education in a classic New England boarding school environment, where diverse learners achieve success.